Should We Ditch Holiday Wish Lists?

Make a list, and check it twice?

On Monday’s episode of “The Real,” hosts Tamera Mowry-Housley, Jeannie Mai, Loni Love, and Adrienne Houghton discussed an article from The Cut, where author Bridget Read voiced her displeasure with holiday wish lists.

“There’s a joy in picking something out based solely on the texture of your relationship to a person, close or not,” Read wrote. “And Christmas lists are utterly joyless. Don’t make them or ask for them! This is my recommendation.”

Despite the author’s argument, Love and Houghton believe it is acceptable (and time-effective) to tell people what presents you want to receive.

“Because people be buying messed-up gifts,” the comic exclaimed.

“I’m not a mind reader. I think that it is the most courteous thing that you can do is give someone your wish list,” Adrienne noted.

The singer continued, “Everybody don’t have time to be sitting there brainstorming about, ‘That one time when I was sitting with Tam and she told me that she liked…’ I’m just saying! I know it seems kind, but it takes a lot of bandwidth in your brain.”

When Mowry-Housley replied, “But that’s the fun of it,” Houghton countered, “It’s not fun when you have over 50 people, or 20 people, to think, ‘Let me think long and hard about what this person really sentimentally might want.’”

For Tamera, gift-giving is all about the recipient’s surprised reaction.

“I feel like it takes away the element of surprise,” the actress said. “I actually agree with this and I had to learn the hard way, because with my family we didn’t make wish lists until we got a little bit older, like in our teenage years. I just didn’t like it.”

Read suggests in her article that you “pay attention to what the people in your life talk about wanting so you can clock it for later, like a Christmas investigator.” Read also recommends tastefully including a gift receipt just in case you “miss the mark.”

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