Dixie Chicks Change Name After Criticism
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The Dixie Chicks will now be known as The Chicks.

On Thursday, while releasing their new protest song “March March,” the country trio announced that they have changed their band name.

In a statement obtained by Pitchfork, band members Natalie Maines, Martie Erwin Maguire, and Emily Strayer gave thanks to a New Zealand singing sibling duo also named The Chicks for allowing them to share the moniker.

“A sincere and heartfelt thank you goes out to The Chicks of NZ for their gracious gesture in allowing us to share their name. We are honored to co-exist together in the world with these exceptionally talented sisters. Chicks Rock!” the Grammy winners wrote.

Last week, writer Jeremy Helligar wrote a guest column for Variety discussing whether the Dixie Chicks should change their name.

While noting that they “have a reputation for being one of the most progressive acts in country music,” Helligar wrote that the word “Dixie” signifies “the epitome of white America, a celebration of a Southern tradition that is indivisible from Black slaves and those grand plantations where they were forced to toil for free.”

Though he acknowledged that the origin of “Dixie” is unclear, Helligar argued, “for many Black people, it conjures a time and a place of bondage. If a ‘Dixie’-loving Southerner today insist the word merely represents a deep appreciation of their homeland, they’re probably white.”

Before Maines joined the group in 1995, Maguire and Strayer — along with original upright bass player Laura Lynch and guitarist Robin Lynn Macy — named their quartet after the song and album “Dixie Chicken” by rock band Little Feat.

Earlier this month, fellow country act Lady Antebellum changed their name to Lady A because the word “antebellum” refers to the period of history before the Civil War, which includes slavery.

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