Lori Loughlin May Be Released from Prison in Time for Christmas

Lori Loughlin may spend the holidays with her family.

On Friday, TMZ reported that the “Full House” star — who is currently serving a two-month prison sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal — may be released on Christmas, or possibly even a day before.

Per the outlet, the Bureau of Prisons says the actress’ release date is Sunday, December 27. However, TMZ says that if an inmate has a release date that falls on a weekend or legal holiday, they can be released on the last preceding weekday.

This means that Loughlin can potentially be released on Christmas Day or even on Christmas Eve.

That same situation happened to fellow “Operation Varsity Blues” parent Felicity Huffman, whose release date was on Sunday but was released on the Friday before. Though she was sentenced to two weeks in prison, the “Desperate Housewives” actress served 11 days.

TMZ also notes that Loughlin may be granted an early compassionate release if her facility — the Federal Correctional Institution in Dublin, California — suffers a COVID-19 outbreak.

Regardless of when she gets out, Loughlin still has two years of supervised release after her jail time.

Loughlin began her prison sentence late last month when she reported to the federal prison — the same one where Huffman served her time.

Back in August, a judge signed off on Loughlin’s plea deal, the terms of which mandated that she pay a $150,000 fine and perform 100 hours of community service.

Per his own plea deal, Loughlin’s husband Mossimo Giannulli — who also admitted to paying bribes to get their two daughters into USC — agreed to serve five months in jail, pay a $250,000 fine, and perform 250 hours of community service.

On Wednesday, a source told Us Weekly that Loughlin has been a “wreck” since entering jail.

“Lori tried her best to be brave and look at the end result, but there was nothing that could dissipate her fears,” the insider explained. “It’s only two months, but she’s dreading it. Her mind keeps telling her that something will go horribly wrong in prison or that her stay could be prolonged.”

A second source added, “Lori really went into prison strong, she had her faith and the support of her family, but the first few days and road ahead are daunting.”

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