Lori Loughlin Released from Prison After Serving Nearly 2 Months

Lori Loughlin has been released from the Federal Correctional Institution in Dublin, California, after serving nearly two months.

On Monday, TMZ reported that the “Full House” star left the facility earlier that morning and flew back home to Los Angeles on a private jet.

The actress — who pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud for her role in the college admissions scandal — began her sentence on October 30.

On the day she was released from jail, a source told People that Loughlin — who, along with incarcerated husband Mossimo Giannulli, admitted to paying $500,000 to get her two daughters into the University of Southern California — had a tearful reunion with her children: Olivia Jade Giannulli, 20, and Isabella Rose Giannulli, 21.

“It’s the end of a very long ordeal,” the insider told the outlet.

A second source told the magazine that Loughlin “seems beyond relieved that she can put her prison sentence behind her.”

“It’s the most stressful thing she has ever dealt with. She plans on spending New Year’s with Olivia and Bella,” the insider continued.

However, the source said Loughlin “is still worried about Mossimo though, and can’t wait to have him home.”

Giannuli — who was sentenced to five months in prison and was ordered to pay a $250,000 fine and perform 250 hours of community service — reported to prison in Lompoc, California, last month.

Now, Loughlin must serve two years of supervised release and perform 100 hours of community service.

Citing court records, People reported on Monday that Loughlin has already paid her $150,000 fine.

In an interview on “Red Table Talk” earlier this month, Olivia broke her silence about the scandal and admitted to her white privilege.

“To be honest, I wasn’t angry,” she said when asked about her initial reaction to her parents’ scandal. “And I think it’s because I didn’t have a good understanding of what just happened. I didn’t see the wrong in it.”

“Like 100 percent honesty, when it first happened I didn’t look at it and say, ‘Oh my God, like, how dare we do this?’ I was like, ‘Why is everybody complaining? I’m confused what we did,’ and that’s embarrassing to admit,” she continued.

“That’s embarrassing within itself that I walked around my whole 20 years of life not realizing, ‘You have insane privilege. You’re like the poster child of white privilege. And you had no idea.’”

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